Fluffy Gluten-Free Waffles

Gluten-Free Waffles

This recipe is a modified version of the one that Iris over at the Daily Dietribe came up with.  I am indebted to her extensive experimentation.  Jul, who eats only gluten-free foods, is also indebted.  And the Pie and Cait are just full.

Iris has experimented enough that she knows which flours will do what, so I followed her advice and used a combination of almond flour and brown rice flour.

Gluten-Free Waffles

Take 1 1/4 cups of the flour and whisk it together with 1/2 cup starch (potato works best but I used corn starch because I can’t find it here), 2 teaspoons baking powder, and 2 tablespoons granulated sugar.

Gluten-Free Waffles

In another, larger bowl, whisk together 1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce, 2 tablespoons melted butter, and between 1/2 and 1 3/4 cups buttermilk (the amount will depend on what kind of flour you are using.  Here I used about 3/4 cup).

Gluten-Free Waffles

For a dairy-free version (and this is already egg-free), you can use 2 tablespoons vegetable oil instead of butter, and instead of the buttermilk you could go for coconut milk.

Gluten-Free Waffles

Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and stir until combined.  Add more liquid, if necessary, a little bit at a time.  If you are making waffles, you’ll want your batter to be a little thicker, while with pancakes you’ll want it a bit runnier.

Gluten-Free Waffles

Then you just pour the batter into a pan or smooth it into a waffle iron and you’re all set. I loved how this was just as simple as making regular buttermilk waffles and took no time at all.

Gluten-Free Waffles

These came out a little darker than I was expecting but they were lovely and crisp, even after I left them to warm in the oven.   Just make sure to spray your waffle iron or your pan frequently or they will stick.

Gluten-Free Waffles

Simple Chocolate Pudding

It is one of my goals while doing this blog to perfect puddings and custards from scratch.  We have already seen the panna cotta I made last summer, as well as the custardy mixture that went into the vanilla ice cream at Thanksgiving, and the custardy failure during the making of my birthday cake.  Here I thought I would dial it down a notch and go with a simple chocolate pudding.  The process is relatively easy, though you have to pay close attention, and all it needs is a few hours in the refrigerator to encourage you to chocolate gluttony.  This recipe (adapted only slightly) comes out of The Joy of Cooking (1997), as all classic recipes should.

In preparation, finely chop 2oz bittersweet or semisweet chocolate.  Set that aside.

In a bowl, drop 3 tablespoons corn starch.

Slowly add 1/4 cup milk (the fat percentage is up to you, as it’s the starch that makes the pudding thick), stirring until you create a smooth paste.  Set that aside as well.

In a heavy saucepan, whisk thoroughly together 1/2 cup granulated sugar, 1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa, and a pinch of salt.Gradually stir in 1/3 cup warm water, making a smooth, runny paste.Bring to a boil over medium heat, making sure to stir constantly.

Remove from the heat and pour in your chopped chocolate.  Stir until melted and smooth.

Then stir in 1 3/4 cups milk (again, the fat percentage is up to you — I used 1%MF).

Stir in your cornstarch milk paste.

Stirring constantly, cook over medium heat until the mixture begins to thicken. 

Reduce the heat to low and bring to a simmer, then cook for a further minute.  Remove it from the heat and add in 2 teaspoons vanilla extract, then pour the hot pudding into 4 or 5 ramekins or pudding cups.  If you don’t want a skin to form, immediately place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the pudding surface.  I like the skin, so I left it as is.  Refrigerate your pudding for at least 2 hours before serving, and up to 2 days.

I served this version with some finely grated dark chocolate and fresh raspberries.  You could also serve it with whipped cream.  Nothing beats pudding.