Creamsicle Pops

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These pictures are terrible. But the results are amazing, I promise. I have quite a bit leftover of that creamsicle pudding I made a few days ago. To be honest, I find it a little oversweet for my tastes at the moment. So I thought I’d tone it down a bit by swirling it with unsweetened cream in a frozen treat. I know that it’s January, but I’m trying to clean out my fridge before we move and I have a TON of whipping cream leftover from the holidays. And I have these super cute popsicle moulds that I haven’t had a chance to use yet.

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Now, if you didn’t know already, the best way to whip cream quickly is to start by chucking your bowl and whisk in the freezer for a while.

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Then it’s a simple matter to whip up that cream.

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Then I kind of alternated globs of pudding and cream in the moulds. I wasn’t too concerned about neat and tidy layers. I was more going for a swirl in any case.

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In fact I’m also terrible at measuring globs so some are bigger than others.

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But you do get a bit of colour contrast. Remember you can do this with juice and yogurt and other kinds of pudding and all sorts of fun stuff.

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Then I chucked them in the freezer. And when they were done they tasted amazing.

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I’m going to pull one out in the morning when the sun is up and add in a beautiful finished shot below, I promise. Stay tuned!

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Creamsicle Pudding

HAPPY BIRTHDAY RUSTY!

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I adapted this recipe from Food52 when I had three oranges and two lemons and I didn’t know what to do with them (other than simply eat them, but that’s not very exciting).

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Start by zesting and juicing your 3 oranges and 2 lemons.

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You should end up with just over 1 cup juice (like a cup plus a couple tablespoons, which is good).

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Set a medium-sized pot on the stove with a couple inches of water in it and set it to simmer.

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Then grab a metal or heatproof glass bowl and crack in 6 large eggs plus 2 egg yolks. Give those a thorough beating-up. They probably deserve it, the jerks.

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Whisk in 1 1/2 cups sugar.

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Then toss in your zest and your juice.

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What a lovely colour.

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Set that on top of the simmering water and make sure the water doesn’t touch the bottom of the bowl. Stir pretty much constantly. If you leave egg yolks and granulated sugar alone for more than a minute they get a bit grainy and we don’t want that. Keep stirring!

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After about 10 or so minutes, the foam will disappear and you’ll have this lovely thick stuff that leaves a trace when you move the whisk. If you test this with a thermometer it should read around 180°F.

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Remove the bowl from the heat and let it cool a bit, stirring occasionally to release more heat. You want it somewhere around 140°F before you put your butter in. My butter was actually frozen so I started adding it in at around the 150°F mark.

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Tip all your lovely citrusy goo into a blender (you can use an immersion blender if you have a deep enough bowl) and add in 2 cups of unsalted butter, a few cubes at a time, mixing thoroughly between each addition, until your concoction is pale and very thick. I may have overfilled my blender here. Oops. All the more reason to make sure the lid stays on.

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The finished product is more or less a curd, so you can use it to fill tarts, spread it on scones or toast (I have some panettone that is simply itching to be slathered), or eat it as a pudding. I’m also tempted to whip up some cream and fold them together to make a frozen fool (though the weather outside is too cold to make me crave cold treats). Just keep it covered and in the fridge if you don’t eat it all right away.

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Wingin’ It Wednesday: A Custard of Sorts

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I had a million yolks leftover.  Like, a million.  And I like pudding.  So I thought I’d make some.  Kind of.

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I started with about 6 tablespoons butter in a pot.

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Then I  melted that and added in 2/3 cup brown sugar and let that get all melty and foamy.

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Then I reduced the heat and whisked in 1/2 cup heavy cream (again, something I had leftover from other stuff).  Added a pinch of salt, then 2 cups milk.

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In a bowl, I took my 6 egg yolks (for argument’s sake, let’s  say there were 6) and whisked them together with 1/4 cup cream and 3 tablespoons corn starch (because I wasn’t sure how custardy these yolks would be after sitting in the fridge all week).

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Ever so slowly I whisked that into the hot sugar/milk on the stove.

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Almost immediately the whole thing began to curdle, but I kept stirring, and then I added 2 tablespoons vanilla.

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Then miraculously things smoothed out quite a bit.

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Plopped that goo in ramekins and chucked them in the fridge.

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Not really pudding.  Or custard.  But tasty.

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Simple Chocolate Pudding

It is one of my goals while doing this blog to perfect puddings and custards from scratch.  We have already seen the panna cotta I made last summer, as well as the custardy mixture that went into the vanilla ice cream at Thanksgiving, and the custardy failure during the making of my birthday cake.  Here I thought I would dial it down a notch and go with a simple chocolate pudding.  The process is relatively easy, though you have to pay close attention, and all it needs is a few hours in the refrigerator to encourage you to chocolate gluttony.  This recipe (adapted only slightly) comes out of The Joy of Cooking (1997), as all classic recipes should.

In preparation, finely chop 2oz bittersweet or semisweet chocolate.  Set that aside.

In a bowl, drop 3 tablespoons corn starch.

Slowly add 1/4 cup milk (the fat percentage is up to you, as it’s the starch that makes the pudding thick), stirring until you create a smooth paste.  Set that aside as well.

In a heavy saucepan, whisk thoroughly together 1/2 cup granulated sugar, 1/3 cup plus 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa, and a pinch of salt.Gradually stir in 1/3 cup warm water, making a smooth, runny paste.Bring to a boil over medium heat, making sure to stir constantly.

Remove from the heat and pour in your chopped chocolate.  Stir until melted and smooth.

Then stir in 1 3/4 cups milk (again, the fat percentage is up to you — I used 1%MF).

Stir in your cornstarch milk paste.

Stirring constantly, cook over medium heat until the mixture begins to thicken. 

Reduce the heat to low and bring to a simmer, then cook for a further minute.  Remove it from the heat and add in 2 teaspoons vanilla extract, then pour the hot pudding into 4 or 5 ramekins or pudding cups.  If you don’t want a skin to form, immediately place a piece of plastic wrap directly on the pudding surface.  I like the skin, so I left it as is.  Refrigerate your pudding for at least 2 hours before serving, and up to 2 days.

I served this version with some finely grated dark chocolate and fresh raspberries.  You could also serve it with whipped cream.  Nothing beats pudding.