Pork-Stuffed Belgian Sandwiches

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

I originally had the title written as “pork-stuffed Belgians” but that didn’t seem right somehow.  I had a vision of a bunch of people walking around in Bruges with sausages coming out of all their pockets.

For the record, the Belgian is the name of the loaf I picked up from the Georgestown Bakery the other day.  Not to be confused with the sweetened tea bread served in Belgium, this is more of a sourdough French bread baked in a shape not unlike a gridiron football.  The thing is, I picked up two, because they were hot from the oven and the guy at the counter was very persuasive.  The other thing is, they’re not so good the next day — a little stale.  We consumed one for lunch that day, and then I had to think up what to do with the second one for dinner.  That’s a lotta bread.  So I kind of made this up on the fly.  I’m sure there are other variations out there, and if there’s one with a nifty name, please let me know.  Also it could use some tweaking so I welcome suggestions.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

Preheat your oven to 450°F and spray a baking dish.  Peel the membrane off one small tenderloin (enough meat for three people), just like we learned.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

I lightly basted the tenderloin with a few drops of Lee & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce, malt vinegar, and hoisin sauce.  Pop that sucker in the oven for about 25 minutes, or until the meat reaches an internal temperature of at least 135°F (for rare).

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

Meanwhile, use a mandolin to thinly slice about four small new potatoes.  I sliced them into a bowl of water, to rinse the starch off.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

Drain the water and pat the potatoes dry.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

Thinly slice as well three small carrots.  We’re working with small today.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

Chop a few broccoli florets up and steam them.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

Toss the potatoes and carrots into a large frying pan with a bit of olive oil and sauté on medium-high heat for a few minutes.  Add in some sea salt to taste.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

Add in about three tablespoons malt vinegar and three tablespoons water and reduce the heat to medium-low until the vegetables are tender.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

Plop in your steamed broccoli bits.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

Plop in a few spoonfuls of plum sauce and teriyaki sauce.  Don’t forget another splash of the wooster sauce as well.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

Now cut your loaf (I used a Belgian, but you might want to try something with a little less bread in it) in half vertically. Slice a hole in each half, being careful not to puncture the sides of the loaf.  We want a little pocket.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

Butter that pocket.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

I thought we needed a bit more sweet in this salty meal so I spread the inside of the pocket with some lovely mango chutney as well.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

At this point your tenderloin should be cooked.  Plop it on a board and cut it up without allowing the meat to rest.  We want the juices to run so they run straight into the bread.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

Stuff pieces of the tenderloin into the pocket.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

Stuff your warm vegetables in as well.

Pork-Stuffed Belgian

I had plenty of vegetables left over, and some meat, and that made a good lunch the next day.  I never want to see bread again.

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