Final Bounty

A short post for you this Friday morning.

Final Bounty 1

Moving day is drawing near and we are experiencing our final summer here at Elizabeth.  And that means that it’s the final year of my first ever solo garden experiment.  If you’ve been following along, you’ll know it hasn’t exactly gone as planned, but I have reaped some benefits.  My delphiniums, the only plant I have ever successfully grown from seed, have survived the construction crew burying them in tree branches and should be in full bloom by the Pie’s birthday (they are his birth flower after all).  The irises my mother sent me that have been churning out bulbs for almost thirty years are finally blooming, as is the accidental wild rose bush I found out back one year and cut entirely down by mistake (the fact that it only started to bloom after I cut it to the ground tells me I did something right).

Final Bounty 2

And the peonies that I rescued and have been coddling for years are having a bountiful year.  Instead of the usual one or two blooms I now have over a dozen (before you pooh-pooh that, remember this is Newfoundland and my backyard is 100% shade).  So I figured I’d cut some down (before they fell) and haul them inside to enjoy, together with a few of the roses trampled by construction workers, and a sprig or two of the noxious weeds that strangle the rest of my flower beds (may or may not be, or related to, Queen Anne’s Lace — jury is still out and I don’t really care).  I may have packed all my vases, but a travel mug does in a pinch.  Happy summer!

Final Bounty 3

Advertisements

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 30

For some reason I still don’t understand, I volunteered to do some baking for prizes to give out at the Pie’s final video game tournament before we move.  Because the group is called Newfoundland Fighting Jam, the Pie and I thought it would be funny to make up some Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 32

You may have heard of jam jams.  From what I understand, the general version is a round sugar cookie sandwich with jam in the middle, where the top cookie may or may not have a hole in it.  The Newfoundland version of this uses a softer molasses cookie.  If you don’t want to make your own you can order some from Newfoundland’s own Purity Factory.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 25

Of course, because we can’t leave well enough alone, we had to mess with the recipe a little bit, and we used our ninjabread cutters to make the cookies.  Keep in mind that below is a doubled recipe, so unless you want a million cookies, I suggest you cut it in half.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 1

Start with 1 cup butter and 1/2 cup shortening (both at room temperature).

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 5

Cream those together in an electric mixer with 1 1/2 cups packed dark brown sugar (the darker the sugar, the fluffier your cookie will be, due to the high concentration of molasses).  Beat the crap out of those ingredients until they’re super fluffy.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 8

Now beat in 3 eggs, one at a time, waiting for each one to be fully incorporated before you add in the next one.  If you want to halve this recipe, I would use one egg plus the yolk of another.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 9

Add in 1 cup molasses (fancy or whatever, whichever intensity of flavour you prefer) and 3 teaspoons vanilla extract.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 11

Look at that silky, creamy molassesy goodness.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 13

In a separate bowl, sift together 6 cups all-purpose flour, 4 teaspoons baking powder, 2 teaspoons ground allspice, and 2 teaspoons ground ginger.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 3

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 4

Slowly add your dry ingredients to your wet ingredients until you form a nice soft dough. And I mean really soft. Resist the urge to add more flour. The squishier your dough is now, the squishier your cookies will be.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 15

Split the dough into 4 parts (2 if you’re halving it) and chill it for at least an hour. Two is preferable. And you want to have all your working surfaces, tools, hands, etc., as cold as possible while you’re working with it.

When you’re ready to go, preheat your oven to 350°F, line some baking sheets with parchment paper, flour a work surface, and get your rolling pin handy. And you’re going to need a lot of flour. Like for the work surface, for your pin, for your hands, for the dough … It’s tacky stuff.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 17

Working with one part of your dough at a time, leaving the others in the refrigerator, roll it out to about 1/4″ thickness (or about half a centimetre, if you’re feeling metric), and cut it out with your cookie cutters.  If you’re doing a circular cookie, some jam jam aficionados like to cut a small hole in the top cookie for the jam to poke through, but that’s up to you, my friend.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 18

If you’re making something other than circles or symmetrical shapes, remember to flip your cutter over so you can make a top and bottom to your cookie.  Our ninja cutters had a duller edge on top, so it made it a little harder, but we persevered.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 19

Eventually we developed an easy system, but it took a bit of time. You will probably sort something out yourself.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 20

If your dough gets too soft, huck it back in the fridge for a bit to stiffen up.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 21

Bake your cookies, rotating the pans halfway through and keeping a close eye on them, for somewhere between 5 and 10 minutes, depending on the heat of your oven and the size of your cookie.  You want these babies to be nice and soft, so make sure to pull them out before they get too brown.  If they don’t look done yet, don’t worry — they will continue to cook on the baking sheet.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 24
Spot the corgi for bonus points!

Allow the cookies to cool completely, then take a wodge of your favourite jam (I used raspberry here, but you could go full-Newfie and use partridgeberry or bakeapple if you want to be truly authentic) and spread it thinly on the bottom of one of your cookies. These ones used about a teaspoon of jam per cookie.  Press that cookie’s pair on top of the jam and then heave the whole batch into a warm oven (like 250°F) for a few minutes to make the jam all cement-y.  This also warms up the cookies again and makes them soft so you can do a little bit of repair work if any of them got bent too out of shape.

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 27

TADA.  Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams.  A mouthful to say.  A mouthful to eat.  A win-win situation for everyone!

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 28

I made this up after doing a bit of research, and my main inspiration for ingredients came from these four down-home recipes, in addition to my own family recipe for Molasses Gems:

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 30

Missing the Rock: Jam-Jams

Salt Junk: Jam Jams Cookies

Mmm…ade: Newfoundland Jam Jams

Rock Recipes: Soft Molasses Cookies or Giant Jam-Jams

Newfoundland Fighting Jam Jams 31

Pulled Pork Mac and Cheese

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 32

Ando made this for Thidz’ birthday last week and it went down so well that he suggested I put it on the blog.  So here it is, adapted to his standards.  While the whole thing takes a little while to prepare, it’s all easy stuff that you can do in stages.  I ended up having most of it ready in the morning and then just chucked it together at the end and baked it.  But we’ll work from the bottom up on this layered casserole.  Also, the recipe says it serves 8, but really it serves 4 because you are going to want seconds.

BOTTOM:

Preheat your oven to 425°F and spray a 9″ springform pan with cooking spray.  My pan was a little wider, but that’s fine.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 6

In a teeny bowl, mix together 1 teaspoon smoked paprika, 1 teaspoon ground cumin, 1/2 teaspoon chili powder, and some salt and ground black pepper to taste.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 9

Peel 2 medium sweet potatoes.  I only had large ones, so I opted to just do one, but I could have used both and it would have been fine.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 5

Use a mandoline to shave off super thin slices.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 10

Chuck those pieces in a bowl, drizzle with a few tablespoons vegetable oil, and add in your spice mix.  Toss with your hands until the oil and spices evenly coat all the potato pieces.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 11

Layer the sweet potato slices evenly in the bottom of the pan.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 12

Bake for 15-20 minutes until they are softened and starting to brown.  Ando wanted to bake them longer to make them more crisp, so I tried that, but I found that once you piled the rest of the ingredients on top they went soft again anyway, so don’t worry too much about that.  The Pie hoped for a thicker layer of sweet potatoes (because I only used the one potato and my pan was wider), so next time I would go for two.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 23

MIDDLE:

Grab yourself some pork tenderloin.  I had a boneless pork loin rib here that was on stupid sale so I used that.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 2

You’ll need 2lbs pork, cut into 2″ chunks.  If I did this again, I would cut the chunks larger, just so your pulled pork strings end up being decently long.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 3

Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil and add in the meat.  It goes gray almost immediately, which is kind of gross.  Reduce to a simmer and leave that on the go for about an hour.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 4

Drain the pork and use 2 forks to shred it into little pieces.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 14

Then you’re going to need some barbecue sauce.  Ando expressed concern that the sauce tended to overpower the more delicate flavours of the macaroni and cheese on top, so we picked out a milder apple butter sauce and it worked out fantastically.  The sweetness of the apple really worked well with the pork.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 13

So you pour 14oz barbecue sauce all over your pork and mix it in.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 15

Then you add in 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar and stir that in as well, then set the whole thing aside.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 17

TOP:

Bring another saucepan of water to a boil and add a pinch or two of salt.  When it’s boiling, add in 8oz elbow pasta (MACARONI) and cook according to your package instructions.  When it’s ready, drain the water, saving about 1/4 cup of it.  Add the water back to the pasta in the pot.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 19

Add to the pasta 1/2 cup grated cheddar cheese (I think the sharper the better), 1/2 cup grated Gruyere (we used Jarlsberg), and 1/4 cup creme fraiche (which is next to impossible to find in Newfoundland, so we used sour cream instead).  Because Ando suggested boosting the flavour of the mac, I added a few crumbles of blue cheese (Rochefort) as well.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 18

Stir that up until it’s all melted, then add a few drops of hot sauce (we used Tabasco) to taste.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 21

Season it with salt and pepper and set it aside.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 22

CRUST:

Melt 1/4 cup butter and stir it up with 1/2 cup parmesan cheese and 1 cup panko breadcrumbs.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 20

ASSEMBLY:

Smooth the pulled pork over the sweet potatoes.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 24

Dollop the macaroni on top of that and flatten it down a bit.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 25

Sprinkle the bread crumb mixture on top of that to completely cover the macaroni.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 26

Bake for 15 minutes, until the casserole is hot through and the bread crumbs are browned.

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 28

DISASSEMBLY:

Ideally you should be able to pop open the springform pan and cut this puppy like a cake.  My pork ended up being supremely saucy and thus too slithery to be architecturally sound in terms of casserole structure.  Meaning I tried to pop off the frame and then the whole thing went sideways — literally and figuratively.  So we just scooped it out with spoons, hence the lack of presentation.  Didn’t matter.  Ate it anyway.  And it was awesome.  Thanks Ando!

Pulled Pork Mac & Cheese 29

The Family Sammy

Family Sammy 10

You may not like this sandwich.  It’s a bit of an acquired taste.  It’s also freaking weird.  But bear with me.  It’s really good once you get past the weirdness.

So this sandwich is actually a family recipe that goes back a few generations, to one set of the great-grands on my mother’s side.  Maybe even back to Scotland.  Hard to say.  Origins shrouded in mystery and all that jazz.

Family Sammy 1

Legend has it that my mother made this sandwich for my father as a token of her love back when they were first together.  She packed it into his lunch and sent him off on his day.  When he discovered this — thing — in his lunch he was absolutely horrified.  My mother was offended that he would be disgusted by such a beautiful sandwich.  Forty years later, it’s one of my dad’s favourites.

(Is any of this making you want to try this yet?  I thought so.)

So first you take some rye bread.  I like the swirly stuff, which is pretty mild but you can get a hint of the rye.  My parents prefer the super dense stuff that slices about a centimetre thick.

Family Sammy 2

On one slice of bread, spread some nice mayonnaise.  On the other slice, some peanut butter.  Crunchy is best, but we have smooth on hand for Papa John so that’s what is on offer.  Don’t worry, it’s gonna get weirder.

Family Sammy 4

Slice up a tomato and slide that onto a slice of rye.  Garnish with salt and pepper.

Family Sammy 5

Add a few pieces of red onion (I usually forego this part but I’m sticking with tradition here, just for you).

Family Sammy 6

Then a few thin slices of cheddar cheese.  The cheese, like the onion, is optional.  The main essence of the sandwich is mayo, peanut butter, and tomato on rye.  But I like it with cheese.

Family Sammy 7

And that’s the sandwich.  I know it seems rather icky, but if you are on the lookout for something a little bit different, I suggest you give it a try.  The combination of tangy mayo with crunchy earthy peanut butter, the burst of flavour from a good tomato on the faint bitterness of rye is actually quite good.  Give it a shot, I dare you.

Family Sammy 8

What’s your favourite weird sandwich?

Cheesy Bacon Scone-Off

Om nom nom nom.

That’s all I can really say about this recipe from The English Kitchen.  And this one from my pal Caroline at The Wanna Be Country Girl.  But which one to make?

Oh come on.  You knew I was going to do something ridiculous like that.  It’s in the title for Pete’s sake.  And any excuse to make these beauties twice is a good one.

So here we go.

Bacon, Cheddar and Rosemary Scones from The Wanna Be Country Girl:

First, fry up about 6 slices of bacon.  I discovered at the last second that my bacon was still frozen, so I did something genius.  While I was doing the dishes I popped the sealed package in the sink and when I was finished with washing up the bacon was ready to go.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 1

Because I was so pleased with myself I made it a round 7 slices.  You’ll want to fry this up extra crispy.  Set it aside to drain and cool, then break into a million little pieces.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 3

Preheat your oven to 400°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

In a large bowl, sift together 2 1/4 cups plus 2 tablespoons all purpose flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, a pinch of salt (if you’re using salted butter leave this out), and 1 tablespoon sugar (I actually forgot the sugar, and I don’t think it made much difference).  If you don’t have a hand sifter, you can shake your flour through a fine sieve instead.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 6

Cut 6 tablespoons butter into small cubes (it’s like halfway between 1/3 and 1/2 cup butter) and plop that into the flour mixture.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 7

Use a pastry cutter or your hands to incorporate the butter into the flour, so in the end all you get is crumbs.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 8

Find yourself some fresh rosemary.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 10

Take about three sprigs of that and chop it up so you end up with about 1 1/2 tablespoons fresh chopped rosemary.  Add that to the flour mix.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 11

Find yourself some sharp cheddar.  If you have access to a Costco or you live in Ontario, make it a lovely Balderson aged cheddar.  It makes everything better.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 9

Gren knows exactly what the cheese grater looks like, where it’s stored, and what it does.  Unfortunately, I am not as liberal with my cheese droppings as the Pie is so he was disappointed today.  Grate up about 1 cup sharp cheddar and add that to the flour mix.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 12

Crumble up your bacon and add that to the flour mix.  Give the whole thing a good stir so everything is evenly distributed.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 13

In another bowl, plop 2 eggs and 1/2 cup heavy cream (whipping cream, in Canada).  Stir that up.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 5

Pour the liquid into the flour.  Stir it around as much as you can.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 14

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 15

Eventually you will need your hands to make everything stick together into a ball. Knead that ball once or twice inside the bowl.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 16

Dump the ball of dough onto a lightly floured surface and pat it down to a thickness of about 1 1/2″.  Use a cutter or a knife to divide it however you wish, and transfer it to the baking sheet.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 17

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 18

Bake for 12-15 minutes, checking to make sure they’re not browning too much.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 19

This one was pretty much fresh from the oven and the butter melted just looking at it.

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 21

See?

Bacon Cheese Rosemary Scones 23

We may have eaten these for dinner one rainy night.  Don’t judge us.

Cheese and Bacon Scones from The English Kitchen:

Preheat your oven to 425°F.  Grab yourself a baking sheet.  

Fry up some bacon.  The recipe calls for 4oz of bacon (who weighs bacon?  The British, naturally), but in the interest of fairness I just used the same amount as I did in the last batch, which was 7 slices bacon.  Go for extra crispy, then let it cool and break it up into wee bits.

Bacon Cayenne Scones 1

Sift together 3 1/2 cups all purpose flour1 teaspoon baking soda1 teaspoon cayenne, and 1 teaspoon salt into a large bowl.  I love my sifter, but a simple sieve is easier on the hands and a mite quicker. If you think your cayenne might be extra fresh, I would recommend using slightly less than a teaspoon — that stuff can build on you.

Bacon Cayenne Scones 2

Use a pastry cutter, and then probably your hands, to work 2 tablespoons cold cubed butter into the mix, until you have a crumb-y consistency.  Same as the last one.

Bacon Cayenne Scones 4

Grate up 1 cup sharp cheddar (again, go Balderson or go home).

Bacon Cayenne Scones 7

Add that to the flour mixture, along with the broken bacon.

Bacon Cayenne Scones 8

Whisk together 1 egg and 1 2/3 cups buttermilk.  You can sour milk with lemon juice, or vinegar but it’s not quite the same.

Bacon Cayenne Scones 6

Make an extinct volcano with your dry ingredients (dig a crater, yo) and pour the wet stuff into the hole.

Bacon Cayenne Scones 9

Mix this into a soft dough with your hands while trying the whole time not to knead it.  Apparently in this recipe kneading is a no-no. Dump your doughy mass onto a floured surface and pat the sticky stuff down with your hands until you get a little square patty about 3/4″ thick.

Bacon Cayenne Scones 10

Then you cut it into about 15-20 pieces. I decided, for science, to do mine the same way I did with the previous recipe, to get a better idea of how each one cooks.  Sliced into thick wedges, yis b’y.

Bacon Cayenne Scones 11

Plop those onto your baking sheet and pop them into your oven for 10-14 minutes, or until they’re risen and a nice golden brown. Just remember that this time is for the smaller square scones. If you make them big fat wedges you’re going to need to bake them for about 20-25 minutes.

Bacon Cayenne Scones 14

This recipe says to let them cool on a wire rack, but I’m not sure I can wait that long.  Where’s my butter?

Bacon Cayenne Scones 17

AND THE WINNER IS

Okay well there is no winner.  They’re both amazing.  I loved the fluffiness and slow heat of the English Kitchen version, and the flaky rosemary-ness of Wanna Be’s was amazing.

I mean, if I make these again I’ll probably combine my favourite elements of the two, and come up with my own version.  I always thought scones were hard, but these ladies have certainly corrected that assumption for me!

Guinness Lamb Stew with Wild Rice

Guinness Lamb Stew 26

I know you all think I’m weird because I don’t like soup.  But spooning hot liquid into my mouth (and spilling it down my face, because that’s how I roll) is not my idea of a good time.  I do, however, have a fondness for stew.  Especially stew with beer in it, because beer is a great tenderizer of things.  And because I like beer.

Guinness Lamb Stew 7

I’ve had this stewing lamb in my freezer for a while and I decided it was probably time I do something about it.

Guinness Lamb Stew 1

So I took it out, put it on a plate, and patted it dry with a paper towel.

Guinness Lamb Stew 2

Then, in a bowl, I took a small scoop of flour, added salt and pepper, and gave it a stir.

Guinness Lamb Stew 4

Into that I hucked the lamb cubes, and gave them a stir as well.

Guinness Lamb Stew 6

I heated up my trusty cast iron skillet with a few tablespoons olive oil inside.  Then, shaking the excess flour off the lamb, I plopped it in the skillet to brown.

Guinness Lamb Stew 8

While that was going on I cut up some vegetables: carrots, an onion, and a package of mushrooms.

Guinness Lamb Stew 3

I didn’t have any potatoes, that classic stew thickener, so I decided to use rice.  This wild rice blend from Trader Joe’s is excellent.

Guinness Lamb Stew 10

Guinness Lamb Stew 11

I took the browned lamb cubes out and put them on a plate to rest a few minutes.

Guinness Lamb Stew 13

Then I added a bit more oil to the pan and chucked in the vegetables, giving the onions a wee bit of a head start in the cooking.

Guinness Lamb Stew 14

Once they’ve softened you can add the rest.

Guinness Lamb Stew 15

Now you can chuck the meat back in.  Then I plopped in some parsley, Newfoundland savoury, rosemary, and thyme.  If I’d had sage I would have used that, just to make up the lyrics to that “Scarborough Fair” song.

Guinness Lamb Stew 16

I also added a few more tablespoons flour.

Guinness Lamb Stew 18

At this point I ran out of space in my pan so I transferred the contents of the skillet to a larger saucepan.  I used a bit of beef broth to deglaze the pan a bit and poured that into the pot, along with the rest of the beef broth (about 3 cups).

Guinness Lamb Stew 19

Guinness Lamb Stew 20

Then came two cans of Guinness stout (minus a sip or two, for quality control of course).

Guinness Lamb Stew 12

Guinness Lamb Stew 21

Then the rice.

Guinness Lamb Stew 22

Then I brought it to a simmer, lowered the heat, and let that gently bubble away, stirring every so often, for about an hour.

Guinness Lamb Stew 23

Excellent. Even more so the next day.

Guinness Lamb Stew 25

Rainbow-Dipped Wooden Spoons

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 27

This is a great and quick gift for people who are just starting out in a new home.  When I saw it over at A Pretty Cool Life I knew I had to do it.  And maybe even jazz up my own wooden spoons while I was at it, though at present I only own two. You can never have too many spoons (especially when you’re entertaining and all is chaos), and these bright and shiny ones are a great accent for any kitchen.

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 24

So you need some spoons, wooden ones. The Pie and I picked these up at Winners for a reasonable price. We did two sets, six spoons each. And you need some craft paint. We had six spoons, so we picked up six colours. We went with Martha Stewart Crafts™ Multi-Surface Satin Acrylic Paint.  It had a nice finish, was easy to apply, and is guaranteed to be non-toxic and food safe.  And if you let it cure for 21 days, then you can pop these babies in the dishwasher with no worries.

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 1

I gave the spoons a quick sand with some fine-grade sandpaper to get some of the splinters and rough edges off.  Then I measured to see where I wanted the paint to go.  These self-healing cutting mats also make great ruler-like work surfaces.

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 2

Then I used masking tape along the line I measured and pressed it down securely to make sure the paint wouldn’t bleed under.

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 3

These are my own wooden spoons here.  I originally wanted to do a set of stripes forming a rainbow on each handle, with them being the reverse of each other, so I blocked off 1″ increments for my stripes, figuring I could do a few colours at a time.  Conveniently, my masking tape is also 1″ thick.

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 4

I wedged the spoons in plastic cups with some rocks in the bottom for stability.  This way they can dry properly without touching anything else.

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 5

Then I set up my palette in an old pie pan.  Re-use, re-use, re-use!

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 6

Then I painted.  It was easy.  Leave an hour between coats to make sure it dries properly.  I ended up doing three coats on the spoons I was giving away, though I only did one coat on my own spoons.

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 7

When I took the tape off my own spoons in order to mask off the already painted sections, I decided I liked the stripes just as they were.

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 8

And if you put the spoons together it forms a rainbow!

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 10

And of course the other spoons are raring to go, just waiting for their requisite 21 days of curing.

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 13

If you have a glass utensil holder, you can put them handle-side-down.

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 19

Or if not, have them handle-side-up.

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 21

Either way, they’re a cheery addition to my kitchen.  Can I keep them?

Rainbow Wooden Spoons 23