Raspberry Red Grapefruit Lip Balm

Raspberry Lip Balm 2

I found this tutorial for making lip balm with freeze-dried raspberries from Hello Natural and thought I’d give it a shot, with a few Ali Does It modifications, of course. I love making home-made lip balm. I find it feels much better and more luxurious on my face than the commercial brands, and I love experimenting with different oils to various effects. As long as you keep a general ratio of 3:1 oils:wax, you’re pretty much golden. The measurements I use below resulted in over 2 cups lip balm, so if you use the same ones, make sure you have plenty of containers to put your balm into.

Raspberry Lip Balm 12

As for the raspberries, well, those are optional, and I think next time I’d leave them out. They settled mostly to the bottom (though that looks pretty, too), and when I mixed them up in some pots they felt grainy against the skin. They taste great, though, and you can easily and quickly lick the grains of raspberry away, but I think if I’m aiming for a tinted lip balm next time I’ll start by staining the oils I’m using rather than adding any other solids and liquids to the mix. Or I’ll try this version, with Crayons. Or maybe not. Anyway, if you’re going to use raspberries, find some freeze-dried ones. Krystopf and Atlas popped down to NYC to visit Ando and Teedz so I asked them to stop into Trader Joe’s to grab a bag or two.

Raspberry Lip Balm 1

I shoved as many raspberries as I could into my spice grinder (it’s a coffee grinder dedicated to all things not coffee) and whazzed them up until they formed a fine powder.

Raspberry Lip Balm 4

Be careful not to breathe that in! One 34g bag of raspberries produced for me about 1/4 cup raspberry powder.

Raspberry Lip Balm 5

But look! Those seeds are no good!

Raspberry Lip Balm 6

So I actually sifted the powder, a wee bit at a time, through a tea strainer to get out the seeds. I think it was worth it.

Raspberry Lip Balm 7

Now that you’ve finished with that nonsense, get your melty bits ready. In the bowl of a double boiler, dump in 1 cup coconut oil, 1/2 cup sweet almond oil, and 1/2 cup beeswax. I also had about 1/2 tablespoon shea butter in the bottom of a jar that was asking to be used so I added that in as well.

Raspberry Lip Balm 3

Once it’s all melted, tip in your raspberry powder as well as about 20 drops essential oils. I used grapefruit. I love pink grapefruit.

Raspberry Lip Balm 8

Then you start pouring. I ended up filling like 27 little pots of varying size.

Raspberry Lip Balm 9

As well as half a small canning jar. I later decanted this into three wee plastic pots and kept it for my own use. I like the balm: raspberries aside, it’s nice and smooth on the lips without being goopy and provides a decent shine for a decent amount of time.

Raspberry Lip Balm 10

As it sets, the raspberries will settle to the bottom. You can stir them up with a toothpick if you like.

Raspberry Lip Balm 11

But I kind of like the ombre effect. Makes a great stocking stuffer/gift!

Raspberry Lip Balm 14

Sage and Honey Hair Pomade

Sage Pomade 7

I LOVE having short hair. I used to have very, very long hair, which went all the way down my back. It was so long I could sit on it. Now my hair is super short and there’s no going back. Every time I change the style it gets shorter. Eventually I will be bald, and I’m okay with that. Anyway, I really like to style my short hair, but it’s very fine and tends to get frizzy in the humidity. The Pie has extremely curly hair, which does the same thing. So we put various kinds of goo in it to keep it under control. This is one of those things. I like the smell of the sage oil combined with the beeswax – it’s a very nice unisex kind of scent.

Sage Pomade 1

I’m not sure how much of this you want to make (I made a whole bunch to give away as gifts), but the basic proportions that I got from Momtastic are 1 teaspoon coconut oil to 1 teaspoon beeswax to 1 drop essential oil.

Sage Pomade 3

Clean and dry whatever containers you’re planning to put the pomade into. I used some old tins I had lying around that I’d saved from mints or tea, plus some plastic containers out of an old shaving kit belonging to the Pie’s grandfather (though I don’t think he ever used it). To figure out how much space I had to fill with pomade, I poured water into each one and dumped it in a measuring cup ahead of time. This ended up making about 2 1/2 cups.

Sage Pomade 2

Plop your ingredients in a double boiler (or a heatproof bowl set above a pot of barely simmering water) and melt that stuff the heck down. I didn’t bother to chop up my beeswax because I messed up my wrist temporarily, but it melted just fine as it was.

Sage Pomade 4

Add in the appropriate number of drops of your essential oil. I used sage, as I mentioned, because it’s a nice relaxing herb.

Sage Pomade 6

Pour the melted mixture into your containers and let it set.

Sage Pomade 8

I saved the bowl scrapings for myself.

Sage Pomade 10

Look at these pretty golden bars of hair loveliness!

Sage Pomade 11

Sage Pomade 12

To use, just scrape out a pea-sized amount with your fingernail. Rub briskly between your palms to melt the wax, and then apply to wet or dry hair.

Sage Pomade 13

I like to put it in while my hair is still damp and then blowdry it to set up some texture.

Sage Pomade 9

Butter fer yer Boards

Board Butter 9

This “recipe” comes from The Art of Doing Stuff and is so easy and nifty that I almost feel like I’m doing something wrong.  I love my wooden kitchen tools and cutting boards but I’m really bad at taking care of them.  This is an easy solution.  You need two things: beeswax, which you can get at any health or craft store; and mineral oil, which you can pick up from pretty much any decent kitchen store that sells wooden cutting boards.  And IKEA.

Board Butter 1

Start by chopping up 2 1/2 ounces beeswax.  

Board Butter 2

Plop that in a double-boiler and melt it good.

Board Butter 3

Such a happy colour.

Board Butter 5

Then pour in 1 1/2 cups mineral oil and stir that around for a while, about five minutes. Just for your edification, I had a bottle with only 250mL (1 cup) of mineral oil, so I adjusted the beeswax amount to 1 2/3 ounces. When you first add it in, the temperature differential will cause it to curdle, but it will melt again.

Board Butter 6

Alternatively, you could melt the beeswax in the mineral oil in the microwave, similarly to how I did it with the lotion.

Board Butter 7

Then you can pour it into cutesy containers and let it solidify.

Board Butter 8

It goes solid from the bottom up.

Board Butter 10

Finished and fragrant!

Board Butter 11

To use, scoop some out with your fingers (it’s quite soft) and rub it into your cutting boards and wooden utensils.

Board Butter 12

Leave for a few hours or overnight and then buff with a dry cloth.

Board Butter 13

Some of my spoons before buttering.

Board Butter 4

And the same spoons after.  TADA!  Makes a cheap and easy gift for the kitchen-minded hostess.

Board Butter 14

Big Beauty Box

Happy New Year!

Beauty Box 39

For Christmas, Teedz requested a repeat of the Beauty and the Beets package she received last year, namely, another couple jars of those luxurious shower scrubs.  So in addition to some more coffee sugar scrub and salty citrus scrub, I made a big beauty box with more aids to relaxation in it: bubble bath, bath tea, and a crowning achievement, homemade LOTION.  I’m not even kidding.  My major regret was that while every woman in my family got a jar of the luscious stuff, there wasn’t enough left over for ME.  I guess I’ll have to make some more.  Let’s begin, shall we?

Rose-Lavender Bubble Bath

We’ll start with the easiest one and get trickier, okay?

For a bubble bath, you need to start with a soap base.  You can use unscented dishwashing liquid, which is super cheap, but I like castile soap because it’s so cool and old-fashioned.  I bought a rose-scented one to use as my base.  Then you need some glycerine for slipperiness and good bubble staying-power.  I picked this vegetable glycerine up at a health food store in the beauty section, but you can also find it in the first aid aisle of your local pharmacy.  To get the lavender part of the rose-lavender scent, I also got some lavender essential oil and some dried lavender, both from the health food store.  And of course you need a container for mixing.

Beauty Box 1

Pour 1 cup castile soap and 2/3 cup glycerine into your container (I doubled this recipe because it was going to two people).

Beauty Box 2

Give those a stir, because they won’t automatically mix.

Beauty Box 3

Next, add a few drops of essential oil and stir again.

Beauty Box 4

For visual variety, add a few teaspoons dried lavender to the mix.

Beauty Box 5

Give that a stir and let it sit for a few days.  The lavender pieces will start to break down in the liquid, infusing it with more lavendery goodness.

Beauty Box 6

I decanted the resulting emulsion (you will have to shake it up a bit before using) into two glass bottles.  This is them sitting next to the new batch of salt and sugar shower scrubs.

Beauty Box 21

Bath Teas / Foot Soaks 

Beauty Box 18

These little sachets of salt are great for their versatility.  You can toss them in the tub, hang them from the faucet while it’s filling, or plop them in a little foot bath for whenever you have a few extra minutes to relax.  The epsom salts are a good healing soak for new mothers and the oatmeal and sea salt make for a skin-smoothing experience.

Beauty Box 7

I made two different flavours of these.  In the first, I started with a base of 3 cups epsom salts and 1 cup coarse sea salt.  Then a few drops lavender essential oil.

Beauty Box 10

To that I added 1 cup dried chamomile flowers and 3/4 cup dried lavender flowers.

Beauty Box 12

All stirred up!

Beauty Box 13

To the other one I started with the same 3:1 ratio of epsom salts to sea salt.

Beauty Box 9

Then I added in 3/4 cup dried peppermint leaves and 2 cups ground oatmeal.

Beauty Box 11

(To make the oat stuff simply chuck some rolled oats — not instant — into a food processor and give it a good whaz.)

Beauty Box 8

All stirred up too!

Beauty Box 14

Then I set up an assembly line.  I used some organza we’d rejected from our screen printing exercises, some hemp twine, and an old plastic easter egg as my container-holder.

Beauty Box 15

I scooped 3-4 tablespoons of the salt mixture into each little pouch and tied it tightly with the string, making a loop so that it can be hung from the faucet.  I used green twine for the peppermint ones and blue for the lavender.

Beauty Box 16

Luxury Lotion 

Beauty Box 34

This is probably one of the greatest things I’ve made.  I played around a bit with the original recipe from Girls’ Guide to Guns and Butter and came up with two separate flavours.  With the ratios I used, the resulting lotion is thick and creamy.  It will leave a bit of grease on your hands that absorbs relatively quickly, and the best part about it is that it doesn’t wash off very easily, which, during cold season when you’re washing your hands constantly, is a very good thing.  Anyway, I suggest you give the above post a bit of a read, just to understand the science of the whole thing a bit more.  I’m just going to plunge right in.

The below proportions make about three cups of lotion each, which makes them ideal sizes to give away as gifts.  If you’d like to be selfish and just make some for yourself, then adjust the amounts accordingly.

Rose Water Lotion:

Beauty Box 23

For this one I cut up a bunch of beeswax.  This is the emulsion that holds everything together.  You’ll need about 4 tablespoons beeswax.

Beauty Box 24

Plop the beeswax in a double boiler or a microwave-safe container (you can do it either way) and start adding in your other liquids.  Here I’m adding about 2 squirts of vegetable glycerine.  This is what makes the lotion all slippery-feeling.  Don’t add too much or it will be too slippery.

Beauty Box 26

Scoop out 3 tablespoons shea butter, which I didn’t realize was powdered until it got EVERYWHERE.

Beauty Box 27

Then 12 tablespoons (3/4 cup) sweet almond oil and 4 tablespoons (1/4 cup) avocado oil.

Beauty Box 28

And then 3 squirts of vitamin E oil.  Not only is this good for damaged skin but it will also extend the shelf life of your lotion.

Beauty Box 29

Melt the beeswax/oil mixture in your microwave or double boiler until there is nothing solid left in it and it’s all mixed together.  Pour it into a tall narrow container (like a wide-mouthed mason jar) that will fit an immersion blender and leave it to cool for a bit.

Beauty Box 30

Basically, lotion is an emulsion of oil and water, and the beeswax is what freezes it into its emulsified state.  So now we need water for this to work.  For this first one I used 1 1/2 cups rose water (you can get this at the grocery store) and 1/2 cup filtered water (if you’re on a chlorinated city water system you’ll want to use filtered or distilled water).  The water and the oil have to be the same temperature in order to mix properly, so what I did was heat up the water to the same temperature as the cooling oil, which was about 130°F.  It just meant that I didn’t have to wait as long for everything to cool properly.  I’m not a patient person.

Now you stick your immersion blender in the oil mix and start whizzing it up until it gets light and foamy.  It will fly everywhere, which is why you should use something narrow to mix it in like a jar.  I used a bowl and things got messy.  I’ll show you a picture in a minute.  Anyway.  As you’re mixing, ever so slowly trickle in water and get it mixed in, a little bit at a time.  If you put them in at the same temperature, you can get all the water mixed in perfectly, though towards the end you’ll have to mix a bit harder to get it all combined.  I wish I had more pictures of this part to show you how cool it is, but I only have so many hands.

Beauty Box 32

It will look like rich, thick icing.  It looked so much like icing, in fact, that my mother walked past it and though that’s what it was.  So she stuck her finger in it and tasted it.  BAD IDEA.  Apparently it tastes awful.  So resist the urge to eat it.

Beauty Box 36

This is the still-warm lotion spread on my hand, so you can see the texture.

Beauty Box 33

Plop it into little jars for storage, or leave it in the jar in which you mixed it, if you’re that clever.

Beauty Box 35

But here is a dobble of the stuff after it’s cooled, and you can see how thick and rich it is.

Beauty Box 38

Orange Whip Lotion:

Here’s the mess I left after the second mixing session.  There’s lotion and oil everywhere.

Beauty Box 37

I didn’t take pictures of the mixing process for the second batch, but I’ll give you the ingredients here and you can go to town.  Just remember that the water and the oil have to be the same temperature (not exactly, but close) in order for the whole science thing to work.

In a heat-proof container, mix together and melt 4 tablespoons chopped beeswax, 2 squirts vegetable glycerine, 3 tablespoons shea butter, 8 tablespoons coconut oil, 4 tablespoons avocado oil, 4 tablespoons sweet almond oil, and 3 squirts vitamin E oil.

Add 8 drops sweet orange essential oil to 2 cups hot distilled or filtered water and drizzle into hot oil mix, blending to emulsify.

Store your lotion in a cool place, maybe in the fridge to be on the safe side.  I’m not sure how long this stuff lasts, with the antibacterial beeswax and vitamin E in it, but you’ll probably use it all right away because it’s awesome, anyway.

It’s relatively easy to clean up, as long as you wipe out your oily-waxy containers with paper towel before washing them in soapy water.

Beauty Box 31

Beeswax Food Wrap

Beeswax Food Wrap 7

Christmas may be over for you, but I’m still going strong with my backlog of gift ideas, so stick with me.  And this one might come in handy for you as you are dealing with festive leftovers.

Start with some scraps of fabric, cut into various shapes, that you can wrap around bowls or sandwiches or whatever.  I finished the edges with pinking shears, so that they wouldn’t fray so fast (once they’re waxy, they won’t fray at all).

Beeswax Food Wrap 2

Then grate a whole bunch of beeswax.  I did 3oz beeswax, which gave me just enough to finish 11 pieces of fabric.

Beeswax Food Wrap 1

Turn your oven on to about 180°F, or as low as it will go, and line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.  Lay a piece of fabric on the baking sheet and sprinkle it evenly with beeswax.  You want enough that when it’s melted it will saturate the cloth.

Beeswax Food Wrap 3

Shove the fabric in the oven for a few minutes.  Keep an eye on it and watch for how long it will take the beeswax to melt — between five and ten minutes.

Beeswax Food Wrap 4

When the beeswax is entirely melted, haul out your baking sheet and immediately remove the cloth from the foil — if you don’t it will stick and get gross.  I waved mine in the air a few times before the wax set and I could set them down.

Beeswax Food Wrap 5

Keep going until all your sheets are finished and thoroughly saturated with beeswax.  If you miss a spot, you can always top it up and shove it back in the oven for a few minutes.

Beeswax Food Wrap 6

Beeswax Food Wrap 8

Use these wraps like you would plastic wrap.  They will mould into shapes with the heat of your hands and stick to themselves, so you can even cover bowls with them.

Beeswax Food Wrap 9

I was going to show you the wrap on a sandwich but I was out of bread so you get deli meat instead in a wrap.  Beeswax is naturally antibacterial, and the wax itself blocks out air, so it makes a really good seal for keeping your food fresh.

Beeswax Food Wrap 10

Wash gently in warm (not hot!) water to remove food goo and to ease the wax back into shape.  TADA!

Beeswax Food Wrap 11

Team Project: Beeswax Art

Beeswax Painting

I still had a huge amount of old beeswax sitting around, leftover from way back when we made teacup candles.  Just blue, though.  Three shades of blue.

Beeswax Painting

I also had a 24″ x 24″ piece of hardboard that I bought back when I had a different sort of idea for the tree branch coat racks.

Beeswax Painting

Beeswax Painting

We can’t waste these things, right?  Well, here’s what the Pie and I came up with together, and I don’t think I would have been able to do this solo. This was our initial plan. A beeswax painting of an ocean scene, a fishing boat attached to a fishing net.

Beeswax Painting

Some hemp string will stand in for rope, and this onion bag will be our net.

Beeswax Painting

But first we had to prep our “canvas”. I took the board outside and sprayed it with Gesso.

Beeswax Painting

Then we needed to prep our supplies. We took the three colours of wax, ripped up the sheets, and jammed them into 3 large canning jars.

Beeswax Painting

Then we plopped them in our canner.

Beeswax Painting

Of course, being full of wax sheets, they floated and tipped over and some of them got some water inside them (which will actually be important later on). So we had to wedge them in place with other jars filled with water and a round wire rack on top.

Beeswax Painting

We brought the water to a simmer and slowly the wax began to melt. As it opened up more space in the jars, we tore up more wax and dropped it in.

Beeswax Painting

Beeswax Painting

And while we were working on that, we also laid out our work area with lots of newspaper.  And I mean several overlapping layers.

Beeswax Painting

Finally we were ready to pour some wax. We wrapped dish towels around the jars to protect our hands.

Beeswax Painting

The initial pour was a little nerve-wracking because we didn’t know what we were doing.

Beeswax Painting

The second one was a bit better, and we started trying to move the wax around a bit before it hardened.

Beeswax Painting

Eventually we ended up with a solid layer covering all the white stuff.

Beeswax Painting

We didn’t end up liking the texture we’d put into the wax with our hands, but we did discover two interesting side effects. We discovered that when we poured the wax at the same time we got these cool marble patterns.

Beeswax Painting

And remember that water that got into the wax? Well it showed up again when we were at the bottom of the jars, and resulted in these neat bubbles.

Beeswax Painting

We decided to do a second layer of wax, now that we kind of had an idea about how this was supposed to go. While we waited for it to melt, I laid out where I thought our fishing net and line would go. It was easy to warm up the wax with a hairdryer and then simply press the net into place.

Beeswax Painting

The original plan was to make the fishing boat out of origami and then just press it into the warm wax, but we changed our minds and decided on an aluminum boat — because many of them are made out of aluminum in reality. Fortunately we had a few tin cans in the recycling and a nice pair of tin snips.

Beeswax Painting

We elevated one side of the canvas so that the wax would flow in the same direction. Gren helped.

Beeswax Painting

Then we poured, using lighter wax up where the sky would be and darker wax in the deeper part of the ocean. We poured some over the net as well to make it look partially submerged.

Beeswax Painting

A close-up of the marbling and bubbles in the boat’s “wake.” Those bubbles are full of water, not air, so we needed to pop them and dry out the water.

Beeswax Painting

While the wax was still warm, we cut it away from the stuff that spilled over the edges of the canvas using a sharp knife and a hairdryer to keep the wax pliable.

Beeswax Painting

Then I heated up a section of the wax and pressed in our little aluminum boat.

Beeswax Painting

The finished piece.

Beeswax Painting

We will be spraying it with a sealant to protect it from scratches (there is already a corgi foot print at the top of it) and then we will mail it home in time for Christmas!

Beeswax Painting

Beauty and the Beets

Beauty and the Beets 2 10

I have extremely sensitive skin.  Just looking at something wrong will cause me to break out in hives, rashes, or various forms of acne.  So I’m very careful about the stuff that I put on and in my body.  I also find that soaps, lotions, and all that stuff made with all natural ingredients seem to me to be more luxurious than the anonymous filled plastic bottles you can pick up at any store.  Why not share that luxury as a gift?  There are two high-powered executive type ladies in my family, so I thought I’d make a little “working woman’s survival kit.”  Here, then, are instructions (from various places) for some little home-made beauty products with a touch of luxury.  I’ll start with the hardest project first, and move to the easiest, though I wouldn’t really call any of these projects hard.

Beauty and the Beets 3

Let’s make some lip balm!  It’s frightening how much you can pay for this stuff in the stores.  This recipe here, which I modified from one I saw on TLC, produces about 3/4 cup (6oz) of lip balm (which filled 12 little half-ounce tubs), and cost me about $4 in supplies.  BAM.  If you were wondering, I got the plastic tubs from Patch on Etsy.

Beauty and the Beets 11

Start with 1/4 cup beeswax.  You can get this in tiny, easy-to-melt pearls from some places, but this being Newfoundland I got it in a solid 2oz block, which is pretty much 1/4 cup.  This stuff is local, from Paradise Farms.

Beauty and the Beets 1

I grated it and cut it up into little pieces.  I recommend getting all your ingredients measured and containers ready to go beforehand, because once this is ready to go you will need to act quickly.

Beauty and the Beets 4

Pop the wax into a double boiler (or metal bowl set over a pot of bubbling water) and let it melt completely. It won’t take long.

Beauty and the Beets 6

Add in 1/4 cup almond oil and 2 tablespoons coconut oil.

Beauty and the Beets 5

Don’t freak out if the wax curdles — it’s just adjusting to the cooler temperatures of the oils, and will melt again.  Just keep stirring. I also added a few drops of peppermint essential oil at this point, just for a nice cooling sensation on your lips and a fresh scent.

Beauty and the Beets 7

When everything has been fully liquified again, you can remove the pot from the heat.  Whisk in 2 tablespoons beet juice for colouring (you can leave this out if you wish and your balm will be whitish or ivory, depending on the colour of your wax).  You can add more if you wish, but make sure to whisk it well, as it won’t fully combine with the wax and oil.

Beauty and the Beets 2

Quickly transfer the liquid to a cup with a spout and pour into your containers.

Beauty and the Beets 10

I worked too slowly (because I was taking pictures, which then ended up blurry, damnit) and had to re-melt my lip balm in the microwave to get it all out.  Make sure to wipe out the cup and the melting bowl with a paper towel before you wash them — it can get messy otherwise.  Work whatever is leftover into your hands.  It’s quite nice.

Beauty and the Beets 9

I probably should have smiled for this photo.  But I didn’t realize how grumpy my mouth looks this close up.  😦  But the balm is very nice, very refreshing and smooth.

Beauty and the Beets 12

Let’s make some deodorant!  Store-bought deodorants are full of all kinds of gross things, and there have been studies done on the links between aluminum used in anti-perspirants and Alzheimer’s.  This recipe, which I modified from the one here, has four ingredients, and each one has a specific purpose.  I doubled what I will present to you below, but it produces about half a cup of solid deodorant.

In a medium bowl, whisk together 1/4 cup baking soda and 1/4 cup arrowroot or corn starch.  The baking soda is your key deodorizer, and the starch is your moisture-wicking agent.

Beauty and the Beets 13

Melt 6 tablespoons coconut oil (your moisturizing agent and the stuff that will hold everything together in solid form) and whisk that in as well.  Add in a few drops of tea tree oil (for antibacterial purposes, and to add a light scent).  I also added in a few drops of lavender essential oil, just for the frivolity of it all — I know, that makes FIVE ingredients.  I love the combination of lavender and tea tree.

Beauty and the Beets 14

Pour that into a container with a lid and allow to solidify.  Apply it to your underarms with your fingertips.  Voila.

Beauty and the Beets 15

***EDIT: So I’ve been using this for a little while now and I have to say that, at least for me, this stuff works BETTER than either the super dooper organic and chemical-free version or the regular brand-name stuff you pick up in the drug store.  Sure, it’s a little grainy going on, but it lasts way longer, there’s no residue getting anywhere it shouldn’t, and in terms of actually deodorizing, it’s tops! ***

Let’s make some shower scrubs!  I think that salt/sugar scrubs are the epitome of pampering oneself at home, so I decided to make not one, but two different kinds.

Orange Salt & Sugar Scrub: In a bowl, mix together 1 cup sugar and 1/2 cup sea salt.

Beauty and the Beets 16

Add in 1/2 cup melted coconut oil, 3 tablespoons almond oil, and 2 tablespoons vitamin E oil (you can get that at the drug store).

Beauty and the Beets 17

Add in a few drops of orange essential oil, as well as finely grated orange zest.  Stir well.

Beauty and the Beets 18

Scoop into a container with a tightly-fitting lid, and keep in your bathroom for when you have some extra time in the shower.  Just remember that those oils can make the shower very slippery when you rinse off, so be careful.

Beauty and the Beets 19

Brown Sugar & Coffee Scrub: Did you know that caffeine is a great thing for your skin?  In a bowl, mix together 1 cup dark brown sugar and 1 cup finely ground coffee (not used coffee grounds).

Beauty and the Beets 21

Add in 3 tablespoons honey and 1/2 cup light olive oil and mix to combine.

Beauty and the Beets 2 2

Scoop that into a container with a tight lid and keep that in the bathroom as well, for when your skin needs a little pick-me-up in the morning!

Beauty and the Beets 2 1

Let’s make some eye makeup remover!  This is so easy, it’s like not even a thing.  Mix together 4 tablespoons olive oil with 3 tablespoons almond oil.  To remove your waterproof eye makeup, simply moisten a cotton ball with the stuff and there you go!

Beauty and the Beets 2 13

Tidy up the edges of your containers before you put the lids on.  Decorate your containers with a few personal touches.

Beauty and the Beets 2 15

Beauty and the Beets 2 12

Presentation is important, even though it’s what’s IN the containers that counts!

Beauty and the Beets 2 9