Capilano Suspension Bridge

Happy Birthday Ando!

Capilano Suspension Bridge

When we were much younger, my brothers and I sailed with my dad on his ship across the strait from Victoria to Vancouver to see the sights.  Back then, I was too terrified to attempt the crossing at the Capilano Suspension Bridge, but the time had now come for me to face my fears.  Ando, his wife Teedz, and my two nieces, Tego and HG, decided to attempt the bridge while we were out west, and the Pie and I thought we would tag along.  I’m really glad we did.  In recent years, the rainforest surrounding the bridge has been turned into a huge educational conservation area, with lots of interesting stuff to see and do.  Admission is pretty steep ($28 for us students), but it’s worth it.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

Right off the bat, you head across the 450ft (137m) bridge, suspended from cables 230ft (70m) above Capilano River.  The Pie told me that the bridge would support 96 elephants, so I was not to worry about falling.  As long as there were no elephants around.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

Tego continually watched me for my reaction every time the bridge bounced under the feet of the hundred or so people crossing it at the time.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

The view of the river (a little low at this time of year) from the middle of the bridge.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

Once across, there were tons of things to see and do to get kids (and grownups) more in tune with the nature around them.  One such activity was to test out your wingspan.  HG was not pleased to be ONLY halfway between a raven and a great horned owl. She’s trying to make herself longer in this shot.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

Tego was happier to be a great horned owl, almost a goose.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

And the Pie broke the mould by being a giant, and an eagle at the same time.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

We were surrounded by so many ancient and massive trees, cedars and firs and all sorts of things.  It was quite a shock to come from Newfoundland, where trees are maybe the height of a house and live for about 40 years, to see things like this Douglas Fir, which was 205ft tall, 20ft in diameter, and about 1300 years old.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

Tego learned quickly what it means to be a tree hugger.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

HG didn’t find the tree’s height all that impressive.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

We also took part in the relatively new Treetop Adventure, which I actually found more nerve-wracking than the big bridge.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

Teedz, Ando, and HG were happier than me.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

But we got some great views and learned a whole bunch of stuff.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

Then we crossed back over the bridge …

Capilano Suspension Bridge

And went on the park’s newest attraction, the Cliff Walk, which is a wee construction sticking out from the side of the Capilano gorge.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

Tego watching to make sure I don’t freak out.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

Because the floor is made of GLASS in some parts.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

HG again was unconcerned.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

In fact she ran ahead while I clutched the rails.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

Once our ordeal was over, the Pie and HG were pleased to accept their certificates for having completed every activity station in the park.  What you can’t see (because it matches his shirt too well) is the Park Explorer button that HG won for completing the Tree Top adventure.  She gave it to her uncle because it didn’t go with her outfit.

Capilano Suspension Bridge

Definitely worth a visit!

Capilano Suspension Bridge

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Author: allythebell

A corgi. A small boy. A sense of adventure. Chaos ensues.

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